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32-bit vs. 64-bit Computing?

Sixty four bit, has been around since the beginning of computing, but it wasn’t in the mainstream marketplace until just a few years ago.  You’ve probably seen that Windows® 7 comes in 32 and 64-bit version and wondered what the difference is.  Trying not to get too technical, we will explain the difference.

The Difference:
32-bit and 64-bit refer to the size of data in terms of integer values. CPUs and memory simply support 64-bit long values. It’s easy to think about it in terms of literal addresses, too.  Say you have a phone book, we’ll call it a the 32-bit phone book, and the integers are the contact information for people.  The 32-bit phone book can list a total of over 4 billion (4,000,000,000) addresses/integers.  Contrast that with the range of 64-bit addressing, which is over 18 quintillion (18,000,000,000,000,000,000) addresses/integers, you can say that the “64-bit phone book” would be able to store the names and contact information for all the people that ever were or will be on the planet.  For your computer, this gives you support for more system memory (RAM), and that means better multitasking and generally improved performance and speed.

How to get it:
It’s easy to get a 64-bit system now.  Many new computers, applications, and operating systems are designed around the 64-bit architecture.  Due to both availability and price, your average desktop computer system supports between 8 GB and 16 GB memory maximum, with high-performance motherboards, systems, and servers supporting much higher total, but still nowhere near the theoretical limit of the 64-bit range.  That’s just fine because buying anything near a petabyte (PB) of memory in this day and age would be a poor decision.

Just go with it:
The obvious benefit to having more memory (RAM) in your system is that it lets you hold more data in a place that the CPU can access quickly.  Your RAM is a much faster resource than using virtual memory that your hard drive needs to store, in part because of the way the data is stored, on chips, and because of the speed of the interfaces.  You may notice when your system is low on available RAM, it begins to chug and hang; that’s your hard drive trying to keep up with the speedy demands of the CPU.

So the bottom line is the 64-bit architecture gives you the capacity to last for many years to come, even considering how fast technology advances.

Please note: Although 64bit versions of the OS are faster at alot of things there are still a number of applications that either flat out don’t work on a 64bit OS or have minor to major issues.

If you have any questions please don’t hesitate to contact us.

  • 08/11/2010
  • IT

8 Reasons To Switch To Windows 7

There are no doubts about the fact that Windows 7 was received with open arms by not only the average computer user, but also by people who jump on every opportunity of criticizing Microsoft. The company drew a lot of flak for Vista, and a huge number of PC users were so frustrated that they went back to XP. But Windows 7 has changed the game altogether. If you are still thinking about a switch to Windows 7 and have some doubts in mind then this article aims to clear the air.

1. Best operating system by Microsoft to date
Yes, Windows 7 is the best Windows version till date in all aspects, and the great thing is most of the software and tools that work in Vista should work in this OS too.

2. Task-bar & Jump Lists
You can quickly pin programs to the task bar, slide and arrange items, and do much more. Another great new feature called jump-lists makes it easy to quickly jump to the frequently used folders and files. There are third-part tools too, like the Jump-list Launcher that let you build customized jump-lists.

3. Better security & interface
Windows 7 looks stylish and better. Features like Aero Snap and Aero Peek make it fun working in the new operating system. Security has been enhanced too. They have taken care of the User Account Control feature, one of the biggest annoyances of Vista users. In Windows 7, it is more flexible and you can actually choose the alert level for User Account Controls.

4. Speed
Quickly get to the welcome screen after press the On button. And not just that, you can see the difference when working with different applications. It’s performance is definitely much better than Vista.

5. Better integration with hardware
Windows 7 supports advanced hardware like touch-screens, is compatible with different kinds of computer parts (much better than Vista) and automatically installs device drivers for new hardware.

6. Upgrading from XP is easy
If you are one of those who switched back to XP after your terrible experience with Vista, and aren’t sure about upgrading to Windows 7, then there is good news – Windows 7 has been built in a way that it supports most of the apps supported by XP and hence upgrading isn’t that difficult.

7. The XP Mode
If you do find a program which you use frequently on XP and it refuses to run on Windows 7, then you could use the Windows 7 XP mode to run Windows XP in a virtual mode right inside Windows 7. Cool, isn’t it? But Remember you must have the Professional or Ultimate Editions.

Which on is right for you?

  • 05/28/2010
  • IT

Secure password without having to remember anything complex

If you want a secure password without having to remember anything complex, try shifting your fingers one set of keys to the right. It will make your password look like gibberish, will often add in punctuation marks, and is quick and simple.

Let’s take a look at how a few of those popular passwords fare when run through this method: * password => [sddeptf * letmein => ;ry,rom * money => .pmru * love => ;pbr

via LifeHacker

  • 04/15/2010
  • IT

Windows 7 Review and 80+ Benchmarks

Finally, Microsoft releases a successor worthy of Windows XP. For the Windows faithful, it’s been a tough eight years. With the launch of Windows XP in 2001, we thought we were poised on a brink of a new world of NT-based goodness—but two years and uncountable exploits later, the future of Windows was grim. Facing a never-ending torrent of new ‘sploits, worms, and trojans, Microsoft fired back with the single greatest operating system update of all time—Service Pack 2. In the single fell swoop of SP2, Windows XP went from Swiss cheese to secure, and once again we were poised to enter the promised land with… (wait for it)… Vista… and finally Windows 7 Review and 80+ Benchmarks

  • 08/13/2009
  • IT