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Tag Archives for " Microsoft "

Searching for “Virus Removal” Tools Can Lead to an Even Worse Outcome

Many people tend to trust well known companies such as Google and Yahoo, but sometimes these search companies serve up some troubling links in their search results. There are many people who use these search sites to find out information about how to remove viruses, etc., but if a user types in “Security Tool Removal,” they are served up dangerous links that go to malicious websites. These websites can create even more of a security risk without the user even knowing.

All links in the SERP (Search Engine Results Page) that are marked red indicate that these sites are dangerous. The red indicator is from the WOT (Web of Trust) Firefox and Internet Explorer add-on. The WOT add-on shows you which websites you can trust for safe surfing, shopping and searching on the web.

When searching “Security Tool Removal” look at how many dangerous websites are marked red. The chances of someone clicking on one of those dangerous links are pretty good.

I encourage and recommend that you download the WOT add-on for Firefox and or Internet Explorer so that you know what links are marked dangerous preventing you from clicking on links that go to malicious websites.

Download the WOT plugin

  • 08/13/2010
  • IT

Ways to Block Pop Ups

Pop ups and other intrusive types of advertising are now used to thrust an ad in your face that you have no choice but to at least acknowledge. Regardless of the nature of the ad, pop ups are a nuisance, and there are now many options available for keeping them off of your computer screen all together.


1. Internet Explorer 8 (Windows Users)
The pop up blocker is integrated into the browser and can be customized by browsing to the “Tools” tab at the top of the program. Like many pop up blocker applications, personal preferences can be set to allow/block pop ups from certain sites, as well as providing customization for how the user is alerted to the fact that a pop up has been blocked.

2. Other Web Browsers (Windows, Linux, and Mac users)
There are other choices for web browsers available, and many have included a pop up blocker long before Microsoft decided to include one with Internet Explorer. Since Mozilla Firefox browser was officially released on November 9th it has included a pop up blocker. Also, check out Google Chrome and Apple Safari.

3. Browser Tool Bars
Many  toolbars offer unique features intended to enhance the user’s web browsing experience in different ways, but they generally also include a pop up blocker. Although there are toolbars available from dozens of websites, Google and Yahoo are the two best available. The installation of these toolbars is quick and easy, and the most difficult part may be reading the fine print in the license agreements. Although these toolbars may do an excellent job blocking pop ups, they may also be retrieving data on your web surfing / search habits. If you feel a toolbar may be the right solution for you, stick with one from a trusted name, and just be sure to read the fine print. By the way we prefer the Google Toolbar.

4. Pop Up Blocker Software
Stand alone pop up blocking software is available from hundreds of different sources. With various interfaces, and prices ranging from free to $30 (and higher). The main drawback to this type of pop up blocking solution is that you now have another independent application running on your computer. Although they are generally not resource intensive, why run a program to do something that can be handled by one that is already running anyway? Additionally, with so many reliable solutions available to eliminate pop ups for free, spending money on one is hard to justify. We suggest you pick from options 1,2, or 3 above.

Final Words
Pop ups are a fact of life on the internet, but that does not mean you need to put up with them. Among the general solutions presented above, there are literally hundreds of options available for eliminating the clutter of pop up ads, allowing you to enjoy only the content you intended to see.

  • 08/09/2010
  • IT

Attacks on the Windows Help and Support Center

Microsoft has been monitoring for active attacks on the Windows Help and Support Center vulnerability (CVE-2010-1885) since the advisory was released on June 10th. At first, they only saw legitimate researchers testing innocuous proof-of-concepts. Then, early on June 15th, the first real public exploits emerged. Those initial exploits were targeted and fairly limited. In the past week, however, attacks have picked up and are no longer limited to specific geographies or targets, and we would like to ensure that you are aware of this broader distribution.

Things to do NOW!

  1. Make sure Windows is up to date
  2. Make sure you have Anti-Virus/Malware/Spyware protection installed and up to date.
  3. When in doubt DO NOT click.

If you have questions please contact us

We also offer a great service called indigoGuard to give you the piece of mind that your computer is protected. Find out more

Via Microsoft

  • 07/09/2010
  • IT

8 Reasons To Switch To Windows 7

There are no doubts about the fact that Windows 7 was received with open arms by not only the average computer user, but also by people who jump on every opportunity of criticizing Microsoft. The company drew a lot of flak for Vista, and a huge number of PC users were so frustrated that they went back to XP. But Windows 7 has changed the game altogether. If you are still thinking about a switch to Windows 7 and have some doubts in mind then this article aims to clear the air.

1. Best operating system by Microsoft to date
Yes, Windows 7 is the best Windows version till date in all aspects, and the great thing is most of the software and tools that work in Vista should work in this OS too.

2. Task-bar & Jump Lists
You can quickly pin programs to the task bar, slide and arrange items, and do much more. Another great new feature called jump-lists makes it easy to quickly jump to the frequently used folders and files. There are third-part tools too, like the Jump-list Launcher that let you build customized jump-lists.

3. Better security & interface
Windows 7 looks stylish and better. Features like Aero Snap and Aero Peek make it fun working in the new operating system. Security has been enhanced too. They have taken care of the User Account Control feature, one of the biggest annoyances of Vista users. In Windows 7, it is more flexible and you can actually choose the alert level for User Account Controls.

4. Speed
Quickly get to the welcome screen after press the On button. And not just that, you can see the difference when working with different applications. It’s performance is definitely much better than Vista.

5. Better integration with hardware
Windows 7 supports advanced hardware like touch-screens, is compatible with different kinds of computer parts (much better than Vista) and automatically installs device drivers for new hardware.

6. Upgrading from XP is easy
If you are one of those who switched back to XP after your terrible experience with Vista, and aren’t sure about upgrading to Windows 7, then there is good news – Windows 7 has been built in a way that it supports most of the apps supported by XP and hence upgrading isn’t that difficult.

7. The XP Mode
If you do find a program which you use frequently on XP and it refuses to run on Windows 7, then you could use the Windows 7 XP mode to run Windows XP in a virtual mode right inside Windows 7. Cool, isn’t it? But Remember you must have the Professional or Ultimate Editions.

Which on is right for you?

  • 05/28/2010
  • IT

Secure password without having to remember anything complex

If you want a secure password without having to remember anything complex, try shifting your fingers one set of keys to the right. It will make your password look like gibberish, will often add in punctuation marks, and is quick and simple.

Let’s take a look at how a few of those popular passwords fare when run through this method: * password => [sddeptf * letmein => ;ry,rom * money => .pmru * love => ;pbr

via LifeHacker

  • 04/15/2010
  • IT

The real-world state of Windows

Performance and metrics researcher Devil Mountain Software has released an array of real-world Windows use data as compiled by its exo.performance.network, a community-based monitoring tool that receives real-time data from about 10,000 PCs throughout the world. Tracking users’ specific configurations, as well as the applications they actually use, the tool provides insights into real-world Windows use, including browser share, multicore adoption, service pack adoption, and which anti-virus, productivity, and media software are most prevalent among Windows users.



View the current state of Windows

  • 09/10/2009
  • IT

Windows 7 Review and 80+ Benchmarks

Finally, Microsoft releases a successor worthy of Windows XP. For the Windows faithful, it’s been a tough eight years. With the launch of Windows XP in 2001, we thought we were poised on a brink of a new world of NT-based goodness—but two years and uncountable exploits later, the future of Windows was grim. Facing a never-ending torrent of new ‘sploits, worms, and trojans, Microsoft fired back with the single greatest operating system update of all time—Service Pack 2. In the single fell swoop of SP2, Windows XP went from Swiss cheese to secure, and once again we were poised to enter the promised land with… (wait for it)… Vista… and finally Windows 7 Review and 80+ Benchmarks

  • 08/13/2009
  • IT

Bing brings Cash to your pocket

Bing cashback is easy as 1, 2, 3: Search, Shop and Save. Within Bing’s product search results or sponsored listings, click on any product or ad with the Bing cashback gleam, purchase the product through the merchant’s site, and get cashback. In most cases, you will have to wait 60 days to get your cashback, but after that period, you can get your cashback via PayPal, direct deposit to your bank account or via check mailed to you.